Blogging University

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I’ve found that in the realm of student centered learning, a lot of people are concerned about learner a missing out on important concepts.This is something that would need to be overcome, especially in applied topics such as nursing.

Considering that with respect to the social media tools and their use within education, I’ve been looking at how we could get more out of blogging as a pedagogical tool. I think the use of blogs and Wiki’s are great, but because they are the unmeasured autonomous component they are often swept away, even though they make the best learning experience.

What if the teachers could integrate blogging in a way conceptually similar to googles 20% time? What if a fifth of your grade could be pass/fail marked over blogging assignments. When you need to know about models of memory consolidation, why not expect a student to spend three hours researching and producing a simple blog post explaining it?

You could have students publishing to their blogs or wikis daily, and some blog topics might be specified while others are free choice. The teacher can then guide students through important concepts, have a good measure of real understanding and the students can benefit from autonomous, empowered, intrinsically motivated learning habits.

It would connect learners for networked learning, and it would add both variety and rigor, which are both essential for beneficial, lasting learning. Realistically, what are the reasons that we aren’t trying this?

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One iPad Per Child

This is my talk on 1:1 iPad policies and social learning that I gave as part of my Science of Education class of my undergraduate psychology degree.

Of the many movements seeking to comission 1:1 computer access in education, I review the arguments for and against, specifically relating to the recent ‘hull report’.

I talk about how the mere distribution of iPads to students without pedagogical change has key shortcomings, yet when looked at through an autonomy supportive social paradigm, they can be a real enabling force for students.
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One iPad Per Child by Chris James Barker is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.